December 5, 2021

Supporting a Child With Dyslexia

Supporting a Child With Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a language-based learning disorder, the complexity of which can feel overwhelming and
frustrating to both children and parents.

There’s a myth that dyslexia is very uncommon. In reality, it’s estimated that dyslexia affects 5-10
percent of the US population, with estimates as high as 17 percent!

The University of Michigan’s DyslexiaHelp center mentions, “Smart and clever individuals who have
difficulty learning to read, spell, and write may be dyslexic. As preschoolers, these children appear to be
developing at the same rate as other children. Then they start school. When confronted with learning to
read and spell, everything changes.”

Children reading a book in her bedroom at home listening to relaxing music on her white bed in the morning.

At CADL, we know that a child’s literacy journey begins long before they strap on their backpack for the
first day of class. Storytimes, playdates, crafts and other activities can all strengthen early literacy skills
and foster a love of reading.

There are so many ways to support children with dyslexia, and it starts with awareness. We’ve compiled
a list of titles and resources to help families learn about and succeed with print challenges.

Dyslexia Titles for Children

• Letting children with dyslexia choose books reflecting their interests is an important way to
encourage reading practice. Some books are designed to be more accessible for children with
dyslexia.

Books for Parents of Children with Dyslexia

Other Resources
• Font support for OverDrive, hoopla and your personal browser.
• Community Resources such as MSU Center for Persons with Disabilities, LCC Center for Student
Access and Michigan Dyslexia Institute
CADL CAST podcast with U-M’s Dyslexic Center


Written by CADL’s Library Services for Persons with Dyslexia Workgroup

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